Lumpy Low Revs, Cause And Cure?

Farnorthsurfer

Senior Member
  • 11 Mar 2020
  • #1
  • California 204 DSG 4Motion MY17
    • 11 Mar 2020
  • #2
  • Salty Spuds

    Senior Member
    • 11 Mar 2020
  • #3
  • Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 11 Mar 2020
  • #4
  • Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 20 Mar 2020
  • #5
  • teamfly

    Senior Member
    • 20 Mar 2020
  • #6
  • BognorMotors

    BMVS Sport & Performance
    • 20 Mar 2020
  • #7
  • DaveD

    Retired
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #8
  • Mooncat

    The Members
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #9
  • You’re showing as a VCDS user — plug it in and start measuring some of the signals being fed to the ECU. If it’s a regen, you’ll see the temperature of the DPF, if it’s the EGR starting to open, you’ll be able to see that etc.

    Slightly off topic — Have you got a Euro 5 van that was registered after September 2016?

    Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #10
  • You’re showing as a VCDS user — plug it in and start measuring some of the signals being fed to the ECU. If it’s a regen, you’ll see the temperature of the DPF, if it’s the EGR starting to open, you’ll be able to see that etc.

    Slightly off topic — Have you got a Euro 5 van that was registered after September 2016?

    Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #11
  • Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #12
  • Pauly

    Senior Member
    • 21 Mar 2020
  • #13
  • Mooncat

    The Members
    • 22 Mar 2020
  • #14
  • It was just with you saying the warranty runs out in May — I was working back three years from that.

    At small throttle openings the EGR should be feeding exhaust gases into the inlet manifold. If there is a restriction in this system or the valve is sticking slightly you can get a bit of what will feel like jerkiness when modulating the throttle. The fact that it goes away after an Italian tune up I think points more towards a regen. I have the E5 140 and during a regen at low rpm, you can hear a difference in combustion noise (it sounds like the injection timing has been advanced) and the van isn’t quite as responsive — most people wouldn’t notice it but if you’re used to tuning a pair of DCOEs and adjusting ignition timing advance curves you will do.

    With VCDS you can see exactly what is going on inside the engine — no more fitting pressure or vacuum gauges, EGT sensors etc they’re all there waiting for you to read in VCDS. Most people that buy VCDS don’t even scratch the surface of what it’s capable of and just code in tow bar electrics or change the stereo output for some rear speakers. It’s a really powerful tool that allows you to see exactly what the vehicle is doing and has lots of module and component test features to help you troubleshoot symptoms (not everything will throw up a fault code).

    Farnorthsurfer

    Senior Member
    • 22 Mar 2020
  • #15
  • Thanks @Mooncat thats good advice. I shall do some reading on the VCDS features and see if I can work out what’s going on.
    It might well be that lots of other people wouldn’t even notice the vibration.

    The van was bought from VW van centre in Inverness with the Das Auto warranty. If there is a problem I would hope to get it sorted before it runs out in May. To be fair the dealer experience has been above my expectation. I won’t even go through the door of the adjacent VW car dealer who are actually the same group.

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